Thursday, January 16, 2014

Dr B's Giants Top 50 Prospects: #22 Jesus Galindo

Jesus Galindo, OF.  B-S, T-R.  5'11", 175 lbs.  DOB:  8/23/1990.

Low A:  .273/.342/.322, 48 SB, 6 CS, 31 BB, 80 K in 326 AB.

One of the frustrations I have always had about the team I used to root for as a kid, the 1960's Giants, was their lack of a speedy leadoff batter who could get on base and manufacture a run or two with his speed.  They have had a couple of players like that for short periods of time like Bill North and Brett Butler, but leadoff has mostly been a problem area for them as long as I can remember.  Over the years, the Giants have had numerous prospects who fit the profile, none of which have made in impact at the MLB level.  I guess you can look at this two ways:  They should give up on the idea and not even try to develop somebody like that or they should keep trying.  I would agree that it is probably not a good idea to use up a first round draft pick on a player with this profile, but a low level IFA signing like Galindo is a low risk proposition and worth the effort to develop him.

Bill North is the closest historical comp I can come up with, although Gregor Blanco is also a very similar player.  Blanco can hit for more power than Galindo has shown, but that sometimes works against him too when he starts trying to pull everything.

At any rate, Galindo has come along slowly as he repeated the DSL and Low A ball with Salem-Keizer sandwiched in between.  Interestingly, he never played for the AZL Giants.  He was promoted to San Jose for the Cal League playoffs with mixed success.  I have to say he looked a bit lost in CF in one of the games I saw which it seems like should not happen to a guy with 5 seasons of pro experience.

Galindo has shown no power to speak of in his pro career so far but has consistently drawn walks and maintained a solid OBP despite unimpressive BA's.  The speed is legit and he's an aggressive base-stealer to take advantage of the speed.

He's probably a bit of a longshot to be an impact MLB player, but you don't give up on that kind of speed easily.  I expect him to the the starting CF for San Jose in 2014.

18 comments:

  1. And before you go jumping all over poor Jesus Galindo here, let's put some things in perspective. A #22 organizational prospect ranking is not generally where you put prospects you think are on the fast track to the majors. If you know anything about the probabilities of #22 ranked prospects having a significant MLB career, they are actually quite small. That does not mean you write off the prospect or refer to them as a "failed" prospect.

    At When the Giants Come to Town, we try to stay positive and focus on the positives. We emphasize what prospects can and might do over what they cannot do or won't do. That does not mean we are blind to their limitations or probabilities of "making it". We just do not write off prospects until they are out of the organization. In the meantime, we try to stay open to their possibilities.

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    1. Makes it all the more sweeter if/when they do break through. Well said.

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    2. Completely agree with you B. I actually really like Jesus Galindo...any kid nearing 50 SB is a kid I'm going to pull hard for. I actually loved Calvin Murray as well when he was moving through the minors (about the time I first started following the G's MiL system). Man, was HE fast!

      I've noticed that Augusta is a very tough place to hit, and a tough place to pitch as well. Medium-solid numbers at Low-A haven't necessarily been harbingers of struggles in the future, and a 3+ ERA or a .270 avg can easily turn into much stronger success down the road.

      I'd like to see Galindo come in around .290 in San Jose, and if he can add a .350 obp and near .390 slg, I think that's a track to the majors.

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    3. I Haven't been commenting much, just reading..But wanted once again to thank you for having this Blog and a great outlet for discussion.

      I am really looking forward to the upcoming Giants season but, more importantly, the 2014 Richmond FLying Squirrels. I live about 50 miles away and got to 6 games last year and hope to double that this season. I'm no scout, but I look forward to adding my worthless two cents.

      By the way, Baseball Prospectus came out with their Top 10 ranking for the Giants (http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=22581 )

      Some surprises including Meija at #2, Blackburn at #5, SUSAC the only position player (no WIlliamson or Arroyo) and Gregorio at #8 and NO Chris Stratton....

      SteveVA

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    4. Was this in response to a deleted comment? What's going on here?

      Galindo wears his socks the right way, I'll say that for him. He's a special talent on the bases, great SB/CS ratios.

      He doesn't have a lot in the way as far as CF depth. Tyler Hollick coming from S/K, Chuckie Jones maybe, and Chris Lofton at SJ. He can hold off that competition most likely, I doubt the Giants would drop him in the Eastern but stranger things have happened.

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    5. No deleted comments. Just got frustrated with the discussion in a couple of prior posts. Just thought I needed to reinforce the general tenor and philosophy of how we look at prospects here. I think we all realize that not all 50 of the prospects discussed here, let alone the honorable mentions are going to have significant MLB career, let alone make an impact.

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  2. Seems like a 4th outfielder type player in my opinion.

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    1. I think Jesus and all of us would be happy if he eventually makes a contribution as a 4'th OF.

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  3. Nice back-handed slap to Brown there in the first paragraph :)

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    1. If it was, it was certainly not intended.

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  4. Elite leadoff hitters have to be the rarest thing in baseball. In my lifetime I can think of maybe 5 that excelled at leading off making them the most exciting player on their team to watch. Rickey Henderson, Vince Coleman (especially those 3 years he stole over 100 bases), Ichiro, Jose Reyes(in his prime 4-5 years), and maybe Kenny Lofton. Maybe I am forgetting a player or two but I honestly think it is the hardest position to fill in baseball. A leadoff hitter has to be able to get on base, have enough speed to steal a base, and not have enough power to be placed in the 3 or 4 hole. Barry Bonds and Andrew McCutchen are good examples of players that started out as a leadoff hitters but power themselves into the middle of the lineup. I'm a sucker for a good leadoff hitter so I will be rooting for Galindo.

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    1. Good analysis. Consistently getting on base while not having enough power to put lower in the lineup is a hard combination to sustain.

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    2. If a guy hits .290 with a .340 OBP and 18 HRs, but steals 60 bases...do you leave him in the leadoff spot?

      I think Pagan is a terrific leadoff hitter, despite good power and the likely ability to perform well lower in the order.

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    3. It depends on what else you have in your lineup.

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    4. Pagan's career OBP is actually a little lower than that at .333. I would prefer a player who hit .290 with an OBP of .360, 2 HR's and 60 SB's in the leadoff spot if such a player was available. Pato's point is it is very hard to find a player like that.

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    5. With, of course, your 18 HR guy moving down to 2'nd or 3'rd in the lineup.

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  5. Expanded replay just got approved and I have to say I couldn't be happier about it. Even if this bites the Giants in the ass a game or two I would rather they get the call right. The only downside I can see is less manager vs. umpire confrontations now that they can casually walk up to them and ask politely for them to review. Selig actually got something right!

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    1. I agree. If you can get the calls right, that has to be the top priority.

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